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Using 8240s/7260 for broad dispersion

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Using 8240s/7260 for broad dispersion
Answer
11/11/15 5:30 PM
If I want the broadest dispersion of sound from a pair of 8240s (as opposed to a single dedicated listening position) should I use the default settings or use the software setup with the mic in many positions?

Re: Using 8240s/7260 for broad dispersion
Answer
11/12/15 1:57 PM as a reply to dumbo.
Hi,

It is not possible to change the dispersion characteristics of a speaker through the GLM calibration because it's defined by the acoustic design. The GLM calibration (single or multipoint) affects mainly to low frequencies and to which area it's optimized. With multipoint calibration you can average the calibration over a slightly larger area.

Re: Using 8240s/7260 for broad dispersion
Answer
11/13/15 2:45 AM as a reply to dumbo.
Ok, thanks Ilkka. I have another question. Can the 8240's be used effectively as monitors without the sub in default mode (without a computer)?

Re: Using 8240s/7260 for broad dispersion
Answer
11/13/15 8:32 AM as a reply to dumbo.
Yes of course! You can use monitors also without computer/GLM connected in stand alone mode. You just need to enable the mode by setting the stored/stand alone dip to stand alone position (see the back panel) and you can operate the speaker through its dip switches as you would operate our analogue range 8000 monitors.

Re: Using 8240s/7260 for broad dispersion
Answer
11/13/15 4:05 PM as a reply to dumbo.
Two final questions (I hope).
1) If I used an iPhone as a digital source could I use it also to control the volume on the 8240s in stand alone (manual setup)? I tried this but it seems that when I have the iPhone turned all the way down it mutes the volume but the instant I bring up the volume slider (on the phone) the level immediately goes too high (even if I have 42db of attenuation dialled in on the dip switches of the speaker.
2) Alternately, could I use the wireless volume control with the new GLM 2.0 interface to control the volume of 8240s in standalone (without a computer)?

Re: Using 8240s/7260 for broad dispersion
Answer
11/16/15 9:01 AM as a reply to dumbo.
Two final questions (I hope).
1) If I used an iPhone as a digital source could I use it also to control the volume on the 8240s in stand alone (manual setup)? I tried this but it seems that when I have the iPhone turned all the way down it mutes the volume but the instant I bring up the volume slider (on the phone) the level immediately goes too high (even if I have 42db of attenuation dialled in on the dip switches of the speaker.

iPhone can only output analogue signal, not digital. Are you sure you have enabled the dip switch controls by setting the stored/stand alone dip to stand alone position? If the 42 dB of attenuation isn't enough, you can attenuate the speaker even more through GLM and then storing the settings with that volume level. Then you can sue your iPhone for volume control.


2) Alternately, could I use the wireless volume control with the new GLM 2.0 interface to control the volume of 8240s in standalone (without a computer)?

Yes, you can use the wireless or wired volume controller as long as you have the network connected and the network interface is powered up. But then you need to select the stored mode because it is equivalent to controlling the volume via computer.

Re: Using 8240s/7260 for broad dispersion
Answer
11/16/15 7:43 PM as a reply to dumbo.

iPhone can only output analogue signal, not digital.


Actually the iPhone (or iPad) can transmit digital audio over a wireless network. I wirelessly transmit from my iPhone to an Apple TV or Airport. I then take the optical out, convert it to AES/EBU and feed into the Genelecs. I must have set something incorrectly last time because I tried again and was able to control the volume from my iPhone in standalone mode. The question remains... Would I get better sound quality using the wireless volume control with the GLM interface (in stand alone mode of course) or... is digital volume control pretty much done the same way regardless of device?

Re: Using 8240s/7260 for broad dispersion
Answer
11/18/15 8:50 AM as a reply to dumbo.

iPhone can only output analogue signal, not digital.


Actually the iPhone (or iPad) can transmit digital audio over a wireless network. I wirelessly transmit from my iPhone to an Apple TV or Airport. I then take the optical out, convert it to AES/EBU and feed into the Genelecs.

Yes, naturally you can do it additional devices but I meant the actual phone as a single device. :)


I must have set something incorrectly last time because I tried again and was able to control the volume from my iPhone in standalone mode. The question remains... Would I get better sound quality using the wireless volume control with the GLM interface (in stand alone mode of course) or... is digital volume control pretty much done the same way regardless of device?

You would have to test it for yourself to be sure. Technically it's better to attenuate the signal after the DSP and signal conversions.

Re: Using 8240s/7260 for broad dispersion
Answer
11/22/15 7:10 PM as a reply to dumbo.

You would have to test it for yourself to be sure. Technically it's better to attenuate the signal after the DSP and signal conversions.


Sorry for all the questions. I thought I was done ;)

I have noticed that, in standalone, if I set the monitor dip switches (and rotary control) to the max attenuation (42 db) I can set my iPhone to maximum output (no digital attenuation at the source). When I do this I get the red overload indicators flashing quite regularly. If I reduce the attenuation at the speakers to 30 db and increase the attenuation at the source (iPhone) I don't get the overload indicators flashing. Any idea why I should need to attenuate the output of the iPhone in order to avoid this? At maximum output shouldn't the iPhone be outputting the full dynamic range of the recording.

Re: Using 8240s/7260 for broad dispersion
Answer
11/23/15 9:37 AM as a reply to dumbo.
Hi,

If you are using analogue signal, the red light indicates that the input is clipping meaning that the output level of the signal is too high for the speaker to handle. Which iPhone version do you have? Is it a direct connection from it to the speakers?

If it's digital signal, then the red light indicates that the digital level of the signal is very close to 0 dBFS.

Re: Using 8240s/7260 for broad dispersion
Answer
11/27/15 10:32 PM as a reply to dumbo.
Hi,
If it's digital signal, then the red light indicates that the digital level of the signal is very close to 0 dBFS.


The source signal is digital. I'm just surprised and confused that the Genelecs are showing digital clipping when I'm using commercial uncompressed CDs (WAV) files. That so that would mean that the iPhone is applying gain to the original signal. That doesn't seem right so I'm wondering if something else is going on. Also, and more importantly...

If I use a pair of 8240s in combination with a 7260 (properly calibrated with the GLM 2.0 interface) what are the ramifications of using them at the correct distance but in a room much bigger than they were designed for (roughy 400 cubic meters)? Am I just going to limit their ability to achieve realistic SPL's?

Re: Using 8240s/7260 for broad dispersion
Answer
11/30/15 9:52 AM as a reply to dumbo.
Hi,
If it's digital signal, then the red light indicates that the digital level of the signal is very close to 0 dBFS.


The source signal is digital. I'm just surprised and confused that the Genelecs are showing digital clipping when I'm using commercial uncompressed CDs (WAV) files. That so that would mean that the iPhone is applying gain to the original signal. That doesn't seem right so I'm wondering if something else is going on. Also, and more importantly...

Source is digital but is it digital when it enters to the speaker? Commercial CDs are very often clipped or too close to 0 dBFS which will then activate the red clip led.


If I use a pair of 8240s in combination with a 7260 (properly calibrated with the GLM 2.0 interface) what are the ramifications of using them at the correct distance but in a room much bigger than they were designed for (roughy 400 cubic meters)? Am I just going to limit their ability to achieve realistic SPL's?

Larger room volume means that there is much less room gain available at the low frequencies which means that the subwoofer has to work harder to achieve same SPL. In other words you can't achieve as high SPL as in smaller room. On the other hand standing waves are less of a problem in larger space.

RE: Re: Using 8240s/7260 for broad dispersion
Answer
8/7/18 2:39 AM as a reply to ilkka-rissanen.
If it's digital signal, then the red light indicates that the digital level of the signal is very close to 0 dBFS.smiley